Box Top Fundraising and Milk Caps

How You Can Help

Students turn in box tops to their teacher’s box top envelope. At the beginning of each month, the ARPS Box Top Committee gathers all the envelopes and tallies each classes valid box top totals.

The box top poster by the cafeteria displays each classes cumulative total and standing in the school wide competition. Lower grades compete against themselves for a monthly prize (a free dress down day of their choosing) and Upper grades compete against themselves for the same prize.

Twice a year the top two classes in the school (one lower and one upper) win the grand prize- a Chic-Fil-a party. Winners are determined by having the highest cumulative total for whichever group they are competing with.

ARPS collects box tops because it is the easiest way to earn money for our school. Families buy food with box tops on the package, eat the food, clip the box top, and turn it into our school. Each valid box top is $.10 for our school. Last year we collected 12,000 valid box tops and earned $1,200. The school’s only out of pocket expense was the postage, to ship the box tops, for the cash redemption.

The Box Top Committee requests that students check box tops before they turn them in. Expired box tops are worth $.00. Box tops that are missing any part of their 3-4 digit code or are missing the expiration date are worth $.00. We ask that you carefully clip each box top to ensure the value remains in tact. If students come across expired or torn box tops with $.00 value please throw them away before turning them into your teacher. This will cut down in the time it takes the Box Top Committee to sort and count each class’ monthly submission.

The Box Top Story

It all started in California in 1996.

General Mills wanted to create a program to help support education and benefit America’s schools – and so, Box Tops for Education™ was born. As part of the initial test program, Box Tops were only available on select Big G cereals, such as Cheerios™, Total™ and Lucky Charms™.

The program was such a huge success that it soon launched on other General Mills products and expanded across the nation. By 1998, more than 30,000 schools were clipping Box Tops and earning cash to buy the things they needed: books, computers, playground equipment and more.

Over the next four years, the Box Tops for Education™ program doubled to include brands such as Pillsbury™, Old El Paso™ and Green Giant™. By 2004, over 82,000 schools across the nation participated in Box Tops, earning more than $100 million.

In 2006, for the first time, non-food brands began to participate; now families could clip Box Tops from Ziploc®, Hefty®, Kleenex® and Scott® products, too. As the program expanded, school earnings increased. By 2010, schools across the nation had earned over $320 million.

Today, America’s schools have earned over $800 million, and you can find Box Tops on hundreds of products throughout the grocery store and online.